Why, Hello Disappointing Self

Writing this out of spontaneity, ergo, this – or just me writing this alone – won’t make sense (because I can’t deal with my senses every time).

One of the things I do for work is to release an article that the nation could pray for. I am not a very good writer (good thing someone edits it before it goes out) but at the very least of doing what I do, I learn. For April issue, I wasn’t able to submit the article for editing / releasing due to constraints of time – my handling of time. I know. I got to be alert next time.

So now, I’m gonna release what I tried to write here (just to satisfy my effort). Perks of having a blogsite.

The Divergent: North Korea

Like in any other country’s history, Korea was once invaded, influenced and fought over by its large neighbouring countries. Since the end of World War II, North and South Korea has been divided. Unlike South, North Korea (NoKor) remained a secretive society – an isolated country with which the people’s needs were not thoroughly met – yet sparked outrage with the rest of the nation because of its space programs and nuclear ambitions.

In its most recent nuclear-armed venture (April 16), NoKor rocket launched its widely-criticised plan to put a satellite into orbit that could impact Australia, Indonesia and the Philippines. The launch marked the centenary of the birth of state’s founder, Kim Il-Sung. UN countries insisted that the move of NoKor breached its agreement with the United States, under which it agreed to suspend its uranium enrichment programmes and missile test in return for US food aid. It also set off alarm bells across the Philippine region in which President Aquino called for US help to monitor the rocket.

The NoKor satellite launch that was hailed as moment of national pride ended in failure. The rocket flew for just a few minutes covering a little over 100km and disintegrated over the Yellow Sea, earning the North Koreans embarrassment as well as condemnation from a host of nations that deemed it a cover test of missile technology.

Despite the failure of its attempted missile launch, North Korea’s provocative action still threatens national security, violates international law and contravenes its own recent commitments to the United Nations Security Council.

Pray for…

  • Kim Jong-un, North Korea’s present leader; that, unlike his father and grandfather, he will no longer enforce any nuclear programs and ambitions of their country and focus on fulfilling the needs of their people instead.
  • United Nations Security Council; that it could protect the countries belonging in it from the countries that could only bring confusion, tension and conflict.
  • The Aquino administration; that it would continue to do what it needs to do to protect the country and its people from national and local threats.

Personality Focus

Voltaire Tuvera Gazmin

Secretary, Department of National Defense

Voltaire Gazmin is the 35th Secretary of the Department of National Defence, being appointed by the President on June 30, 2010.

Even at an early age, his performance was seen brilliant, serving as a young soldier and leading various intelligence unit of the Philippine Army. He became instrumental at the time when he was a part of the Presidential Security Group who defended the government of President Corazon Aquino from seven coup d’etat attempts during her regime.

The Secretary was one of the most honoured officers in the Philippine Army. In recognition to his outstanding military service, he was also made Ambassador of the Philippines to Cambodia from 2002 to 2004. His discipline and upright demeanour earned him the respect of his peers and his military co-officers.

Pray for…

  • The Secretary; that he would be given wisdom and knowledge on the decisions he should do and the things he might overlook which concerns the relationship of Philippines and other countries.
  • The military; that they would cooperate to the Department of National Defence in giving its best aid to protect the state from the countries that could threaten Philippine security.
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Psalm 124

Last 13th of October last year, I attended the Dialogue Education (Vella) Seminar. Every morning then before we start, we dedicate 30 minutes to an hour of devotion, we are lead by our facilitator Miss Vylma.

Anyways, one day Miss V asked us to do our own versions of Psalm 124 as part of our devotion. Here’s what I wrote mine back then.

(Raw file. Don’t mind my grammar.)
“If the Lord had not been on my side–let Kriselle say–if the Lord had not been on my side when doubts, fears and rejections I had on myself and from other people, I would have left myself and throw myself a Pity Party every now and then. I have been scared all my life and I would not experience the mercy and grace of my Heavenly Father.

Praise be to the Lord, God, my Father for whenever I ran far away from Him, he always follow me and catch me each time I fall. Indeed, he’s lovingkindness is better than life and as much as I can–and by his grace–I will live a life that will serve as a testimony to draw more people close to his side. I’m a work in progress and I know that he will never leave me until I fulfill his purpose in my life.”

Something to inspire me whenever I’m down. Try doing your own versions of Psalm 124. It’s like a mini reminder to yourself when doubts came knocking in the pouring rain. :)

Draw The Line

Your generation is extremely lucky because technology has made you more powerful than the generations before you. Even though I’m much older than you, this is also my graduation year: the year I left traditional media to start a new media company called Rappler.

All around the world, the Internet is turning businesses upside down. Society is shifting beneath our feet. Last week, Facebook bought Instagram, a company that was a year-and-a-half old with 13 employees, for more than a billion dollars.

It’s a flat world today where a small start-up like Rappler can compete against established, better-funded newsgroups. It’s a world where ideas can come from anywhere around the world and travel in the blink of an eye. Ideas from you here in this room now reach decisionmakers in ways never possible before.

Managers my age are trying to understand a digital world that comes naturally to you. So you’re actually entering the workforce with an innate advantage: you don’t have to unlearn the baggage of the past, and you’re better prepared to take risks and discover this brave new world.

Technology has made you as powerful as your future employers. You’re coming of age at a time when your inputs are as valuable as those much older than you.

The virtual world is just like the real world – but faster with no boundaries. It’s a world where people, ideas and emotions travel through densely interconnected social networks. The Philippines, according to ComScore, is the world’s social media capital, and Facebook connects 845 million people around the world, the largest ever in the history of man. How many of you here have Facebook? That’s both a positive and a negative for you because I think it makes it harder for you to deal with the challenge that faced generations before you: how to build meaning into your life.
Meaning is not something you stumble across nor what someone gives you. You build it through every choice you make, through the commitments you choose, the people you love, and the values you live by.

For me, it begins with the choice to learn. Learn all the time. Learn all your life.

Learn from your successes, but more importantly, learn from your failures. When I was about a year older than you, I became a CNN reporter. Like most things in life, I stumbled onto this. I’m a behind-the-scenes person – a producer and director, but for whatever reason, CNN made me a reporter, and I was scared.

I still remember my first standup – the part where you speak directly to the camera. It was so bad my boss in Atlanta sent it back and told me to do it again. He said, “Put on a suit and makeup. You look 16. Your voice is too high. ” I asked, “how do I change my voice?” He said, “drink brandy.” Really, I thought? He said, “Speak with authority.”

To me it translated to “be more arrogant” – I had a pet peeve about a way of being on camera – that air of knowing everything hits me as arrogance. I didn’t want to pretend I knew everything because I didn’t.

Between arrogance and self-confidence
Over the years, I learned that being on-camera is the most unnatural way of being natural. It’s about self-confidence, but there’s a thin line between self-confidence and arrogance. So I watched myself – you know how hard it is to watch yourself? – and I kept doing it over and over again until I was happy. I put in my 10,000 hours – that’s the amount of time Malcolm Gladwell said it takes to become an expert at anything. That’s the point when you start to create – when it fully becomes you.

Being a reporter shaped a lot of who I am today: the ability to walk in anywhere, make quick judgements, ask tough questions, speak plainly.

It all began with that moment of failure.

I wish you the courage to fail – because success and failure are two sides of the same coin. You cannot succeed if at some point you haven’t failed. I’m not the first to say this, but I can tell you I’ve proven it first-hand. You can’t accomplish anything important if you don’t take risks. And you won’t risk if you’re afraid to fail. So “fail fast. Fail forward. Fail better.”

I’m very lucky to have lived through journalism’s golden age. I reported on Southeast Asia’s transition from authoritarian one-man rule to democracy. I had a front-row seat to history: Lee Kuan Yew stepping down in Singapore, the riots leading to the end of Suharto’s 32 year rule in Indonesia, Mahathir ending 24 years as Malaysia’s Prime Minister – so many more. From politics to economics to disasters, social upheavals and terrorist attacks, I was there.

I’ve seen the best and the worst of human nature. In West Kalimantan, I watched young boys playing soccer in a field. Except when I got closer, I realized the ball they were using was the head of an old man. That weekend, I saw 8 people beheaded and nearly threw up at a checkpoint where a man was eating a human foot like a drumstick while a decapitated head was on a metal drum next to him.

I saw 600 people buried in a mass grave and wondered where God was. I have been shot at and stoned. I’ve learned South Korea has the most painful tear gas. I’ve run for my life and used my body to shield one of our interns after we were caught between protestors and the military. I’ve learned it’s easier to risk my life than those of others who trust me.

I’ve learned my greatest enemies are boredom and complacency. When I stop learning or I feel like I’m on auto-pilot, I know it’s time to move on.

It took nearly 20 years of travelling the world for breaking news before my search for meaning pushed me to look beyond CNN. It brought me back home to the Philippines. It was time to stop writing about what other people were doing and build something again.

The Role of Fear
Six years heading ABS-CBN’s news group taught me how to manage Filipinos and how difficult it is to build institutions in this country. It gave me an up-close look at the problems of our society – the problems I hope your generation solves.

I learned people will try to coerce, manipulate, intimidate or threaten you to get what they want. Often, they have a lot at stake, big money, sometimes their lives. And you have to be clear about what you’re afraid of because those are buttons they will push.

Which brings me to the role fear will play in your life. Some people do their best to avoid what they fear. Even when I was younger, I felt that gave fear too much power, and in the process, it begins to define you. So I thought – well, what’s the worst thing that can go wrong? I’ll fail? Remember what I said about failure. Seek it out. Remember the phrase: what doesn’t kill you will make you stronger? It worked for me. What doesn’t kill me will make me stronger.

That’s why I believe it’s so much better to confront your fear than it is to run away from it – because when you face it, you have the chance to conquer it. In doing that, you define who you are.

I’ve learned that the worst fears are not what other people can do to you. What’s harder is when you are alone and answer the tough questions of every day life: What do you stand for? What do you believe in? How far will you go to stand up for what you believe?

Draw the Line
This is your moment to draw your lines. When I was your age, I didn’t set out to fight corruption. That battle found me. The company I helped form in my 20s, Probe, began one of the first public battles against it. At the end of each program, we said Probe supports the fight against envelopmental journalism. Over the years, I discovered how endemic corruption is the root of much of what’s wrong in our country today. In ABS-CBN, I took a zero tolerance approach to corruption: both for our people and those who tried to bribe us. It started because I drew a line when I was your age.

This is your moment to draw your lines. There are some simple truths. The more you say no, the easier it becomes. The more you do the right thing, the harder it is to do the wrong thing. It’s a tipping point approach to building your identity.
My line in the sand was defined long ago – when the fiancée of one of my closest friends offered me $150,000 to do a story for CNN. It wouldn’t be traceable, he told me, and it would be deposited directly into my bank account. He gave the offer over lunch, and although I wanted to say no immediately, he held my hand and said, please take at least a night to sleep on it and think about it.

I was shocked. I didn’t even tell my friend. That night, I thought about it. But then reality stepped in. My sense of self is tied to being a professional journalist, and I couldn’t look at myself in the mirror if I accepted the bribe.

I had drawn the line clearly, and I knew that accepting that money would make me a fundamentally different person. On this side of the line, I’m good. On the other side, I’m evil. On this side, I’m clean. On that side, I’m corrupt. It’s that simple.

Remember that evil people don’t think they’re evil, and corrupt people don’t think they’re corrupt. Corruption is endemic in our country because people rationalize it. They split hairs about definitions. It takes all of us to keep it that way or to change it. The only way it will change is if more of us take a stand against it and refuse to tolerate it.

This is the time to define your ideals because it only gets murkier the older you get. People will tell you “you’re naïve.” They’ll say “it’s the way things are done.” Don’t believe it when people say that. The choice is always yours. Choose to do better.

Which brings me to the last lesson I want to share with you today. You have to have the courage to say no.

Corruption will be significantly reduced if everyone in this room today said no. No to your friends who say it’s ok to do what everyone else is doing. No to your family. Because that is how corruption spreads. Through our social networks.

All of us like to be liked, but remember that being part of any group carries a price. Studies show that peer pressure actually distorts reality so be careful the friends you keep. People will do things as part of a group that actually go against their morals or even harm others.

We Filipinos believe in social harmony, SIR – smooth interpersonal relations, but I’ve seen too many people stand by while the group does bad things in their name.

Take responsibility for the world you are creating.

Let me end the way I began. Now more than ever, technology will give you more power, make you more interconnected. While that is exciting, I think it may make your fundamental search harder – the question we all set out to answer. How do you build meaning into your life?

I’ve given you some of the lessons I learned in trying to answer that question. In the end, you can put all those lessons into this one sentence. You build meaning by choosing what you commit to: whether it’s a cause, a religion, an ethical order, the people you love, the nation you are creating.

The ingredients are there. You are the only one who can put them together in the unique pattern that will be your life. Do it with your eyes open and remember this self, sitting there, so you can remind your future self about the lines you draw now.

I made a vow to myself a long time ago when I was sitting where you are now: I would never say or do anything I didn’t believe in. I maintain a healthy distrust of herd mentality. I’ve kept those vows to my younger self, and everytime I face a difficult choice, I remember the lines I’ve drawn.

I think this is why I can stand before you at nearly half a century old and tell you it’s possible to live your ideals. You do not have to compromise.

Take a stand and change the world. We’re counting on you.

GRABBED AT: Rappler.com
Maria A. Ressa delivered this speech at the 84th commencement exercises of the Far Eastern University, Manila, on April 18, 2012.

* * * * *

This speech was just so brilliant in so many ways I don’t even know where to start! Miss Maria Ressa, I salute!

Here are my favorite parts:
•Meaning is not something you stumble across nor what someone gives you. You build it through every choice you make, through the commitments you choose, the people you love, and the values you live by. For me, it begins with the choice to learn. Learn all the time. Learn all your life.

•Learn from your successes, but more importantly, learn from your failures.

• I put in my 10,000 hours – that’s the amount of time Malcolm Gladwell said it takes to become an expert at anything. That’s the point when you start to create – when it fully becomes you.

•It all began with that moment of failure.

•I wish you the courage to fail – because success and failure are two sides of the same coin. You cannot succeed if at some point you haven’t failed. I’m not the first to say this, but I can tell you I’ve proven it first-hand. You can’t accomplish anything important if you don’t take risks. And you won’t risk if you’re afraid to fail. So “fail fast. Fail forward. Fail better.”

•I’ve learned my greatest enemies are boredom and complacency. When I stop learning or I feel like I’m on auto-pilot, I know it’s time to move on.

•I learned people will try to coerce, manipulate, intimidate or threaten you to get what they want. Often, they have a lot at stake, big money, sometimes their lives. And you have to be clear about what you’re afraid of because those are buttons they will push.

•Even when I was younger, I felt that I gave fear too much power, and in the process, it begins to define you. So I thought – well, what’s the worst thing that can go wrong? I’ll fail? Remember what I said about failure. Seek it out. Remember the phrase: what doesn’t kill you will make you stronger? It worked for me. What doesn’t kill me will make me stronger.

•That’s why I believe it’s so much better to confront your fear than it is to run away from it – because when you face it, you have the chance to conquer it. In doing that, you define who you are.

•I’ve learned that the worst fears are not what other people can do to you. What’s harder is when you are alone and answer the tough questions of every day life: What do you stand for? What do you believe in? How far will you go to stand up for what you believe?

•This is your moment to draw your lines. There are some simple truths. The more you say no, the easier it becomes. The more you do the right thing, the harder it is to do the wrong thing. It’s a tipping point approach to building your identity.

•I had drawn the line clearly, and I knew that accepting that money would make me a fundamentally different person. On this side of the line, I’m good. On the other side, I’m evil. On this side, I’m clean. On that side, I’m corrupt. It’s that simple.

•Remember that evil people don’t think they’re evil, and corrupt people don’t think they’re corrupt. Corruption is endemic in our country because people rationalize it. They split hairs about definitions. It takes all of us to keep it that way or to change it. The only way it will change is if more of us take a stand against it and refuse to tolerate it.

•This is the time to define your ideals because it only gets murkier the older you get. People will tell you “you’re naïve.” They’ll say “it’s the way things are done.” Don’t believe it when people say that. The choice is always yours. Choose to do better.

•Take responsibility for the world you are creating.

•You build meaning by choosing what you commit to: whether it’s a cause, a religion, an ethical order, the people you love, the nation you are creating.

•The ingredients are there. You are the only one who can put them together in the unique pattern that will be your life. Do it with your eyes open and remember this self, sitting there, so you can remind your future self about the lines you draw now.

•I think this is why I can stand before you at nearly half a century old and tell you it’s possible to live your ideals. You do not have to compromise.

•Take a stand and change the world. We’re counting on you.

What speech could someone have ever asked for than this? Sincere, genuine, and outright. Thanks Miss Ressa, this is an inspiration! :)

Wait For A Man

That will put in the time, heart and effort to pursue you. None of this whole chasing-around-boys-who-don’t-really-like-us-and-pine-when-they-reject-us business.

Wait for God to set you up with one who will put in time to win your heart. How can He do that if you’re throwing it at Him?

Be secure enough in yourself and your Father that you don’t need to throw your heart around and give it away to any man who winks his eye at you. Be a woman, secure in God, deadly to the devil, feminine in strength, purity and tenderness. Give your man a chance to be a man.

Let the boys who blow you off and expect you to let them walk all over you or just plain won’t put in effort to get to know you at all go. Let them go, and position yourself as a woman satisfied in herself and her life.

Give yourself to the all-knowing God, give yourself to loving others, and your man will come alongside you. You will never have to strive to make him like you, to make him talk to you. He will be already a man in pursuit of your heart without your help.

******

Although I just recently pass through the Teen Years, I still feel that I belong to that same age group. Well, twentyteen is not too far an age, right? :P But seriously, I admit that I haven’t reached maturity yet–in thinking, speaking, acting and even dressing up.

I’m still a big fan of Miley (even when she changed her image); my ultimate favorite movie is still A Cinderella Story; I don’t have a nose for classic literatures yet, instead, I’m addicted to chic-flicks; I still wanted “wished” for people to somehow notice me all the time; most times, I don’t walk my talk; I still wanna look good in front of others; and I still think that when a guy smiles at me or talks to me nicely that he just might be the one for me (I can go weirder than that).

Do you ever or do you still have those problems too? Or is it just me all along? Ha! Unfair. Real maturity depends on how one define maturity for themselves. But when it comes to boys—sometimes it’s a whole different story altogether.

You know, I’ve never been in any relationships EVER. Ergo, I don’t really know what is going on there. However, I’ve always been waiting…waiting…waiting…and waiting…waiting patiently for someone who would be willing to go in that journey with me. I’ve always known the virtue of waiting–the best is yet to come. For single ladies like me, though, it seems like the best is stuck in a gigantic maze somewhere which makes it harder for them to find us. Thus, makes the waiting all the more challenging for us to do.

It’s easy to give in, the world is generous and will give you a handful of choices. But you see, the world only offers good and better, there’s only One who could give you the best in life. He wanted to give us the best and we ought to wait for it expectantly, not losing heart. We don’t need to give in and lower our standards and our quest for something perfect. Believe that the perfect (one who would really suit you) will come. Believe it and it will.

Ladies, we are God’s princesses. What does princesses deserve? Princes, right? Somebody once said, carry yourself like a queen and you’ll attract a king. A queen will never settle for anything less than the best; she knows what she deserves. Same thing for us. Never lower your expectations with the guys. Never compromise your standards. Life would be sweeter if your prince will go a long way–thorns, bush and all–to find you in the arms of your Father. Then, isn’t it a life worth having? Isn’t it a man worth waiting for?

Touchdown, Baguio!

This is a late post! Forgive me? :)

When I was young (not that I’m so old now, but you get what I mean), I haven’t had lots of experiences of going out of the Metro since we haven’t had budget then. See, my mom was a single parent and we really had quite a lot of hard times then (I will have to do a separate entry for this); ergo, travelling was not that of a priority . Thank God, though, we are able / starting to do it now.

Last (year) Holy Week, we–mother, brother, me + Tita Vi’s family–visited our relatives in La Union and had a quick drop-off at Vigan. And it seems like we’re enjoying North so much, this time we went to Baguio–a relief from the intense heat in Manila! Oh boy, I was just so giddy because it is, ladies and gentlemen, my First time in the City of Pines! Haha. I know, right? Super late-bloomer lang ang peg.

Anyhooo, we travelled at around 4am. It was still dark, but I tell you, traffic was just amazing–a lot of people were on the road already.

It would be a long ride going to Baguio but it wouldn’t bore you if you got your family, cute cousins, and tons of music with you! Oh, did I mention sight-seeing would be cool at this point too?

You would pass through provinces like Tarlac and Pampanga and at this time, some of the people there were doing their yearly Holy Week penitence–carrying the cross and then eventually would be hanged there or hitting their backs with something sharp that would leave it bleeding all the way through to where they were supposed to go. By doing these, they believed that they would become somewhat nearer as to what Christ had done for them / for us 2000 years ago by reliving it and that it would pay up for their sins. It’s the culture there. But personally, I don’t really approve of it and I hope that that kind of culture would stop because we don’t have to do it anymore, you know, to pay up for our sins . Christ died on the cross 2000 years ago to clear our debt to sins. That’s how He loved us; He wanted a relationship with us. Agree? Orayt.

By 10-11am, we headed for a quick stop over (Pangasinan at this time) to go grab something to eat. What’s the best way to beat the summer heat? Eat Razon’s halo-halo! That will do it for’ya! That we do too! Oh, in Pangasinan, Razon’s halo-halo is only P65 (P30 cheaper than in Manila and it’s much yummier, di ba Brother?)!

Lo and behold, an hour after lunch, we’re saying hello to Baguio na! Weeee! (I believe this is Kenon Road kase the Lion’s here eh! :P)

And there’s a lot of pasalubong items from here pa lang!

Lookey lookey, we found Stitch!

We arrived in the afternoon where the sun was at its peak. It wasn’t cold as I expected it would be–winter-cold kase yung nasa isip ko, yung exagge lang! HAHA. But, although King Sun was so welcoming, he wasn’t as scorching as he would be like when you meet him in Manila. Plus, when the wind blew your direction, it really is presko! Sarap! HAHA.

Our first stop was the Burnham Park to find somewhere to eat because we are definitely starving upon arrival. This is the famous park in Baguio; it’s like a key place you could go to. We weren’t able to scout the whole place, though–I wasn’t able to go biking and all that. Boo. :/

Fresh strawberyy taho + the view from your balcony = perfect way to start your freezy morning! :)

I’m so addicted doing these kinds of photographs with trees and Mr. Sun as subject. Nature is the best! More of Baguio was our agenda the following day… And so, we go…

There were a lot of people at Mines View, I cannot even take a decent picture of it. Ugh!

We visited the strawberry farm also! It’s fun picking strawberries (and then eating them as soon as you picked them while no one’s looking)! HAHA. There were lettuces and broccolis around the farm too–guaranteed fresh, I tell you!

My ultimate fave spot in Baguio is found at Camp John Hay–the Cemetery of Negativism. No, it’s not what you think, I thought of that too at first. But, Cemetery of Negativism is a place where you burry all your self-imposed infliction, your most limiting factor and your heavy burdens. These were my favorite tombstones. The idea was just really cool!

Our last destination was at the Philippine Military Academy (PMA) where we went gaga having our pictures taken with the marines, soldiers, navy, etc. My iPod doesn’t do justice on these pictures, but promise, Baguio was way lot beautiful than these. You should go see for yourself if you haven’t been in the place.

What I really noticed about Baguio was its greens! There are a lot of trees–Pines! And it made me happy because I love to be surrounded by tons of them. And so, I was disturbed about these SM plans of earth-balling them for their car park. Come on!

Baguio was really beautiful. Stick with greens and save the trees!

XOXO, Ninsy

The Future We Want

Is a Nationwide Essay Writing Contest.

Revised Contest Dates, Rules and Guidelines 

1. The contest is open to all Filipinos, 16-22 years old. Contestants may or may not be currently enrolled in a Philippine school/college/university.

2. Contestants must describe in as much detail as possible the features of a future world they would like to see—The Future They Want—in no more than 2500 words. The content of the essay must adopt as much as possible the advocacy underlying the UN Conference on Sustainable Development, or the Rio+20 Summit.

See http://www.uncsd2012.org/rio20/index.html

3. All essays must be written in English.

4. Essays must not only “read” well but must also “sound” good when “read aloud.” Shortlisted essays will be read on-camera by their writers and the video, webcast.

5. The deadline for submission of entries is on 11 June 2012, 5:00 p.m.

6. Entries must be sent by email to: unic.manila@unic.org, with a copy to: teresa.debuque@unic.org. Indicate in the subject line: “The Future We Want” Essay Writing Contest_(Your Full Name).

7. An email acknowledging receipt of entry will be sent to the applicant.

8. A shortlist of 10 entries will be chosen by a panel of judges on 12 June 2012.

9. The writers of the 10 shortlisted entries will be invited to undergo a verification exercise—an on-the-spot writing test.

10. Once the shortlisted candidates have passed the test, they will be invited to read their essays on-camera at the Venice Piazza at McKinley Hall, on 15 June 2012.

11. Video of the essay-reading will be streamed on UN Webcast as well as on various social networking sites on 20 June 2012—the opening of the Rio+20 Summit.

12. An online poll of the 10 shortlisted essays will be conducted on UNIC Manila’s Facebook Page from 21 June-10 July 2012. The essay that receives the most number of “Likes” will be adjudged “People’s Choice Awardee.”

13. A panel of judges will determine the top 3 winners on 13 July 2012.

14. The awards will be handed out in a ceremony to be held on 16 July 2012 at the Atrium of Eastwood Mall.

15. The First Prize Winner will receive P15000 and a trophy; the Second Prize Winner, P10000 and a trophy; and the Third Prize Winner, P5000 and a trophy. A “People’s Choice Award” will be given to the winner of the online poll.

16. The top three winning entries and the People’s Choice Essay will be published in a newspaper of national circulation.

Grabbed at: United Nations Information Centre(UNIC) Manila